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Continuity of Care

Posted by: Rhonda May 21, 2019

“The importance of early relationships between children and the adults in their lives is well documented,” write Kay Albrecht and colleagues. While this fact is undisputed, traditional practices in childcare, such as moving children on to a new room or caregiver based on age or developmental milestones, easily disrupt these critical connections.

The approach of continuity of care, on the other hand, works to create “healthy, supportive, and responsive relationships through one crucial strategy—sustaining relationships over time.”

This article provides a thorough examination of the benefits of relationship continuity in early childhood and is well worth the read: Strategies for Sustaining Relationships

Music image

Raising Intelligent Children

Posted by: Rhonda May 14, 2019

“The United States faces an epidemic of unparalleled proportions,” write Gina Fontana and Ralph Barrett in this provocative call-to-action. “We have raised a generation of socially, cognitively, and physically underdeveloped children, leaving parents and teachers struggling to find solutions.” 

What can early childhood educators do to ensure that children are equipped with the skills they need to succeed in today’s society? Bring back the creative arts! Music, art, and dancing “allow children to be creative, take risks, and express themselves in innovative ways.” The whole body of a child must be involved in learning, not just their brain, for the child to develop into a productive, well-rounded citizen. Read more here.

Maple Street

Dividing a Space to Build Community:

Posted by: Rhonda April 30, 2019

A Community Playthings Case Study
Maple Street School, Brooklyn, NY

Contrary to its description, a room divider can actually be used to build social connections and increase a sense of community.

Starting as a tiny parent coop in 1978, Maple Street School recently had the opportunity to begin a new center from scratch. This allowed them to examine the vision of their school and re-imagine what that could look like in reality. With a strong emphasis on community, they wanted classrooms that would allow children to experience cooperation, inclusion, and a sense of family.

In this case study, staff members explain why they chose to use Community Playthings room dividers and furniture to support their vision. View here.

Maple Street

Dividing a Space to Build Community:

Posted by: Rhonda April 30, 2019

A Community Playthings Case Study
Maple Street School, Brooklyn, NY

Contrary to its description, a room divider can actually be used to build social connections and increase a sense of community.

Starting as a tiny parent coop in 1978, Maple Street School recently had the opportunity to begin a new center from scratch. This allowed them to examine the vision of their school and re-imagine what that could look like in reality. With a strong emphasis on community, they wanted classrooms that would allow children to experience cooperation, inclusion, and a sense of family.

In this case study, staff members explain why they chose to use Community Playthings room dividers and furniture to support their vision. View here.

live streaming

Active Play away from Passive Screens

Posted by: Rhonda April 23, 2019

Screen-Free Week 2019

A healthy childhood depends on play. Play is not a break from other daily learning activities; play is active learning at its peak. It is through play that kids construct knowledge of their physical, social, and emotional world.

But, increasingly, children’s invaluable “play time” is spent mindlessly swiping screens or passively staring at a screen. Time spent in this morphed concept of “play” is displacing time spent in active play.

Screen-Free Week, this year celebrated from April 29 – May 5, challenges participants to unplug and “rediscover the joys of life away from screens”. An hour once dedicated to TV can become an hour of creative play, reading, or enjoying nature. Screen-Free Week gives families an opportunity to explore other options, try out new activities, and reconsider their future media use. Read more.

Don’t forget to share this great article with your staff and families.